{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 4614, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4614", "Disp_Access_No" : "2019.008", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2018", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2018", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2018", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled (Badlands)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "<i>Untitled (Badlands)</i>", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Juventino Aranda", "Sort_Artist" : "Aranda, Juventino", "Disp_Dimen" : "57 x 77 x 2 in. (144.78 x 195.58 x 5.08 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "57 in.", "Disp_Width" : "77 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil on wool Pendleton blanket", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on wool Pendleton blanket", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Juventino Aranda created this painting by applying oil stick and paint to a striped Badlands National Park blanket from Pendleton Woolen Mills. The resulting fields of color evoke the paintings of Abstract Expressionist Mark Rothko (1903–1970) but are interrupted by a dripping mass of black paint that references the extraction of oil and other natural resources on national lands. Pendleton has produced blankets based on Native American designs since the late 1800s. The blankets are often given as gifts and used in ceremonies in tribal communities, but in recent years they have also become expensive commodities trendy among consumers who have little knowledge of the designs’ origins or meanings. After touring one of Pendleton’s factories near his hometown of Walla Walla, Washington, Aranda began making works using the company’s discarded products, highlighting the ongoing appropriation and exploitation of Indigenous culture in American society. ", "Dedication" : "Gift of Todd B. Rosin & R. Todd Armstrong, 2019.008", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Mixed media", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "Contemporary", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2019.008_Low-Res.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2019.008_Low-Res.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2019.008_Low-Res.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2019.008_Low-Res.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "10098", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4605, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4605", "Disp_Access_No" : "2019.002", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2017-2018", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2017", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2018", "Disp_Title" : "If Marco Polo Brought the Pasta Meme to Europe from China, He didn't Need to be a Pasta Chef but all he Had to do was to Disperse the Meme in the Environment and Other Humans Infected by it, Would Express it in their Behaviour", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "<i>If Marco Polo Brought the Pasta Meme to Europe from China, He didn't Need to be a Pasta Chef but all he Had to do was to Disperse the Meme in the Environment and Other Humans Infected by it, Would Express it in their Behaviour</i>", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Rokni Haerizadeh", "Sort_Artist" : "Haerizadeh, Rokni", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 11/16 x 16 1/2 in. (29.72 x 41.91 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 11/16 in.", "Disp_Width" : "16 1/2 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Gesso, watercolor and ink on printed paper", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Gesso, watercolor and ink on printed paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In this work on paper, Rokni Haerizadeh transforms an iconic British Royal wedding portrait of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle into an outlandish scene. By overpainting the original image with animal figures, distorted features, and other surreal details, the artist critiques mass consumption of such coded displays of soft power and points to the ugly truths they conceal. This work is part of a larger series of the same title that includes modified images of protests, military actions, and political summits. Together, they reflect the process of mutation that oft-replicated images and narratives undergo—much like memes, mentioned in the title—as they circulate through our collective consciousness. ", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Contemporary Council, 2019.002", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Mixed media", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "Contemporary", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2019.002_Low-Res.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2019.002_Low-Res.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2019.002_Low-Res.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2019.002_Low-Res.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "11318", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4617, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4617", "Disp_Access_No" : "2019.011.01", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2018", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2018", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2018", "Disp_Title" : "Dress for Success", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "<i>Dress for Success</i>", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Rose Nestler", "Sort_Artist" : "Nestler, Rose", "Disp_Dimen" : "24 x 18 x 5 in. (60.96 x 45.72 x 12.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "24 in.", "Disp_Width" : "18 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Leather, thread, batting, grommets, hooks ", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Leather, thread, batting, grommets, hooks ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Brooklyn-based artist Rose Nestler describes her sculptures as having an “alert softness” that reflects the tension between the exterior and the interior self. <i>Dress for Success</i> realizes this duality by pairing its armored facade of conical breasts with its soft, deflated form. The sculpture is part of Nestler’s <i>Power Suit</i> series. In this ongoing body of work, she reinterprets iconic items of clothing that were originally designed to conceal, shield, or enhance women's bodies. The term “power suit” refers to the wide-shouldered, angularly cut business attire worn by many women during the 1980s in the corporate sector, a space historically dominated by men.", "Dedication" : "Gift of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York; Hassam, Speicher, Betts and Symons Funds, 2019.011.01", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "3-D Object", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "Contemporary", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2019.011.01_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2019.011.01_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2019.011.01_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2019.011.01_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15254", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4608, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4608", "Disp_Access_No" : "2019.005", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2018", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2018", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2018", "Disp_Title" : "this trembling turf (the shallows)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "<i>this trembling turf (the shallows)</i>", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Mary Ann Peters", "Sort_Artist" : "Peters, Mary Ann", "Disp_Dimen" : "60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.92 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "60 in.", "Disp_Width" : "48 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "object", "Medium" : "White ink", "Support" : "clayboard", "Disp_Medium" : "White ink on clayboard", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<i>this trembling turf (the shallows)</i> is part of a series in which Seattle-based artist Mary Ann Peters explores ways of marking the overlooked or hidden evidence of subjugated peoples. Using white ink on black clayboard, the artist created an intricately textured surface composed of spikes and “blips,” as she has called them. The rhythmic pattern references the sound waves used by archaeologists to uncover buried traces of ancient civilizations. Peters started her <i>this trembling turf</i> series in 2017 following an artist residency in Beirut, where she learned that the lush fairways of a local golf club are thought to overlay a mass grave: in 1982, a militia linked to the right-wing Maronite Christian Phalange party killed hundreds, if not thousands, of Palestinian refugees and Lebanese civilians in two refugee camps in West Beirut. Though created with these specific places and events in mind, Peters’s work is abstracted, opening broader questions she has posed when discussing the series, such as, “Is there a country on the planet that doesn't have the same kind of tormented past?” ", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by Seattle Art Fair, 2019.005", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "Contemporary", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2019.005_Low-Res.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2019.005_Low-Res.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2019.005_Low-Res.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2019.005_Low-Res.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15253", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4616, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4616", "Disp_Access_No" : "2019.010", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2015", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2015", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2015", "Disp_Title" : "Egungun", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "<i>Egungun</i>", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Cauleen Smith", "Sort_Artist" : "Smith, Cauleen", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 x 9 in. (30.48 x 22.86 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Archival pigment print", "Support" : "rag paper", "Disp_Medium" : "Archival pigment print on rag paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Cauleen Smith is an interdisciplinary artist currently based in Los Angeles whose work often reflects on Afro-diasporic histories. This photographic “portrait” shows a mysterious figure shrouded in shells. In Smith’s <i>Egungun: Ancestor Can’t Find Me</i> (2017), a related video, the figure emerges from the sea and wanders zombielike in a lush tropical landscape before burying itself in the sand. Smith drew inspiration from Yoruban societies in West Africa where <i>egungun</i>, costumed dancers who appear at large public celebrations as visible manifestations of departed ancestors, are a significant spiritual and cultural presence. However, Smith’s version is more harrowing, as the figure appears lost and alone, perhaps representing the spirit of an enslaved African who drowned during the Middle Passage. Smith created the <i>Egungun</i> photographic series and video during a residency on Captiva Island, Florida, where the remnants of shell mounds are all that remain of the Calusa, the island's original inhabitants. In Smith's film and photograph, the <i>egungun</i> serves as a figurative embodiment of the legacies of slavery and colonialism in the present day—an unsettled ancestral presence severed from the lineage of its people and culture. ", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by the Contemporary Council, 2019.010", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Photograph", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "Contemporary", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "https://corbettvsdempsey.viewingrooms.com/the-big-dig-cauleen-smith-/", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2019.010_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2019.010_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2019.010_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2019.010_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13487", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4609, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4609", "Disp_Access_No" : "2019.006", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2019", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2019", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2019", "Disp_Title" : "To a Flame", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "<i>To a Flame</i>", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Anthony White", "Sort_Artist" : "White, Anthony", "Disp_Dimen" : "60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.92 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "60 in.", "Disp_Width" : "48 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "Object", "Medium" : "PLA (plastic) on panel", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "PLA (plastic) on panel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Seattle-based artist Anthony White makes his “paintings” with a small machine about the size and shape of an electric toothbrush. It feeds and heats strands of colored polylactic acid (PLA), a type of plastic, in a time-intensive application process the artist compares to using a tattoo gun. In <i>To a Flame</i>, White presents a layered commentary on how smart phones and social media saturate our lives and absorb our attention. White elevates an intimate but mundane scene of a man scrolling on his phone through the dramatic, high-contrast illumination of the figure, which recalls the European tradition of Baroque painting. With the inclusion of photo-editing icons placed over the image, the painting suggests that the viewer, too, is looking into a screen, underscoring the extent to which digital technologies mediate how we see one another and ourselves. ", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds provided by Seattle Art Fair, 2019.006", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Painting", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "Contemporary", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2019.006_Low-Res.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2019.006_Low-Res.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2019.006_Low-Res.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2019.006_Low-Res.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "10003", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 4610, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/4610", "Disp_Access_No" : "2019.007", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2019", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2019", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2019", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "<i>Untitled</i>", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ko Kirk Yamahira", "Sort_Artist" : "Yamahira, Ko Kirk", "Disp_Dimen" : "46 x 90 in. (116.84 x 228.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "46 in.", "Disp_Width" : "90 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "object", "Medium" : "Acrylic and graphite on partially unwoven canvas with wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic and graphite on partially unwoven canvas with wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Seattle-based artist Ko Kirk Yamahira meticulously removes individual threads from the weave of his canvases, deconstructing his paintings and turning surface into form. In this work, the artist has created two detached segments linked with loose threads by pulling out the vertical strands in the middle section of the canvas and then stretching the intact ends around separate wooden frames. Yamahira does not prescribe a fixed orientation for his pieces, making the arrangement presented here but one of many possible configurations. ", "Dedication" : "Purchased with funds partially provided by Seattle Art Fair, 2019.007", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Mixed media", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "Contemporary", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2019.007_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2019.007_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2019.007_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2019.007_Fang_Low-Res.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15261", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }